Rocky Mountain National Park's Finest Hikes

Rocky Mountain National Park's Finest Hikes

Lace up your boots and get ready to explore the huge wilderness of Rocky Mountain National Park, the place the windswept tundra accommodates an ecosystem of hundreds of species of wildflowers, and the sculpted peaks silhouetted against the blue sky function a dramatic reminder of the last ice age. Traverse this great backbone of the Continental Divide and listen for bugling elk or spot recent bear scat beneath your feet. Come celebrate the 100th anniversary of certainly one of America’s oldest national parks in the time-honored tradition – backpack on, strolling sticks in hand and sense of marvel restored.

It’s a big place, so that will help you find your way, listed below are a few of Rocky Mountain’s best hikes.

Bear Lake
Bear Lake is likely one of the park’s hottest locations for first-time guests, and with good reason. From here you’ll have a entrance-row vantage point of the dramatic glacial valleys and hulking granite summits that make Rocky Mountain such a singular landscape. With ten lakes in the space and superb vistas, you must positively expect giant crowds.

Hikes right here range from straightforward jaunts round Bear Lake (0.5 miles) or to Alberta Falls (1.6 miles) to more challenging excursions that comply with the glacial valleys as much as their origins. Mills Lake (5.6 miles) is a good alternative, as is the Loch (6.2 miles), which will be extended to the exquisite Lake of Glass and Sky Pond (9.8 miles), both of which are as serene as their names suggest. And while Flattop Mountain (12,324ft, 8.eight miles) will not be the park’s best summit, there’s no denying its magnetic pull from down below. Use the park shuttles to get to the trailhead.

Bear Lake to Fern Lake
This dayhike is a ranger favourite and recognized for its diverse scenery. On this hike you'll climb as much as the treeline and an alpine lake earlier than dropping back down via fields of scree and right into a forested valley. Right here you’ll pass more lakes, waterfalls, aspen groves and elk-inhabited meadows.

Because of the park shuttle system, this is a one-approach trip that requires no backtracking – and what’s more, it’s largely downhill. You can’t miss Lake Helene, which sits serenely beneath the imposing rough-lower cliffs of Notchtop and Flattop mountains. To do this hike, park at Fern Lake Trailhead (the endpoint), then take the shuttle to Bear Lake Trailhead. Shorten the trip by simply going to Lake Helene and back (5.eight miles).

Longs Peak & Chasm Lake
Iconic in each way, Longs Peak is the head of RMNP and one among colorado posters’s traditional climbs. The tallest peak in the park (14,259ft), its exhilarating and exhausting Keyhole Route is on many visitors’ to-do list. The highest of this route is the crux, consisting of slender traverses, vertiginous cliff faces and heart-pounding clambering up polished slabs of rock. Most people begin the climb by 3am in an effort to attain the summit earlier than noon.

The great news is that you just don’t have to succeed in the summit or flip your legs to jelly. Chasm Lake, positioned at the foot of the Diamond – Longs’ legendary east face where technical climbers rope up to scale the 1000ft wall – is routinely rated as one of the park’s finest hikes. Chasm features all of the spectacular scenery of the height without the risk and arduous ascent. However, at 8.4 miles spherical journey, you’ll still must be in very good shape.

Gem Lake
At the northeastern finish of the park is Lumpy Ridge, composed of 1.eight-billion-12 months-old granite formations that have been sculpted by the elements somewhat than by glaciers. This markedly completely different style of abrasion has resulted in an array of whimsically formed boulders, balancing rocks and colossal domes. The trail to Gem Lake is a good way to discover the world, with superb vistas back to the Continental Divide all the way as much as the bijou-like lake.